Historical Dictionary of the U.S. Army by Jerold E. Brown

By Jerold E. Brown

Having advanced over the last and 1 / 4 centuries to turn into the ideal army strength on this planet, the U.S. military has a historical past wealthy in historical past and culture. This ancient dictionary presents brief, transparent, authoritative entries on a wide pass component of army phrases, ideas, hands and gear, devices and agencies, campaigns and battles, and those that have had an important influence on military. It contains over 900 entries written via a few a hundred students, supplying a worthwhile source for the reader, scholar, and researcher.

For these attracted to pursuing particular matters extra, the e-book presents resources on the finish of every access in addition to a normal bibliography. Appendixes supply an invaluable checklist of abbreviations and acronyms and a list of ranks and grades within the U.S. Army.

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Historical Dictionary of the U.S. Army

Having developed during the last and 1 / 4 centuries to develop into the foremost army strength on this planet, the U. S. military has a historical past wealthy in background and culture. This old dictionary offers brief, transparent, authoritative entries on a vast move part of army phrases, techniques, hands and gear, devices and agencies, campaigns and battles, and those that have had an important influence on military.

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Except for the bow machine gun, all armaments were removed, and a crane arm replaced the main gun on the turret. Removal of the M3’s turret permitted an A-frame jib to be mounted on the hull for more strength and flexibility in retrievals; additional armament was added, including an 81 mm mortar* to provide smoke screens; a redesigned suspension provided more stability for winching and lifting. A winch inside the ARV could be employed for direct hauling or hoisting over the crane arm. Various compartments for tools and spare parts were added to the exterior of the hull.

Stuckey, “Echelons above Corps,” Parameters, December 1983, 39–41. Andrew N. * As a separate entity within the Army, the GHQAF was relatively short-lived, lasting only until 1 March 1939, when the OCAC absorbed it, again centralizing command of the entire Army air arm. Events in Europe prompted an unprecedented Air Corps expansion beginning the same year. Plans called for the procurement of 10,000 aircraft, of which 7,500 would be combat types, a threefold increase over the pre-1939 force levels.

Washington had avoided disaster, but the Revolution was at a low ebb. Then, in a ten-day campaign at Christmas, Washington turned on his lethargic foe, won victories at Trenton* and Princeton, and drove deep to occupy positions in the mountains of New Jersey, where he was unassailable. Now he stood on the flank of the British supply lines running across New Jersey. Howe had no choice but to withdraw to New York City, with little to show for all his efforts of 1776. Reinforced in 1777 by another large contingent of fighting units, the British resumed their offensive.

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