The Irish classical self : poets and poor scholars in the by Laurie O'Higgins

By Laurie O'Higgins

The Irish Classical Self' considers the position of classical languages and studying within the development of Irish cultural identities within the eighteenth and 19th centuries, focusing particularly at the "lower ranks" of society. This eighteenth century concept of the "classical self" grew in part out of influential identification narratives constructed within the 17th century by means of clerics at the eu continent: Read more...

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The Irish Classical Self considers the position of classical languages and studying within the building of cultural identities in eighteenth and 19th century eire. Focusing specifically on the Read more...

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The Irish classical self : poets and poor scholars in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

The Irish Classical Self' considers the position of classical languages and studying within the development of Irish cultural identities within the eighteenth and 19th centuries, focusing specifically at the "lower ranks" of society. This eighteenth century concept of the "classical self" grew partially out of influential id narratives constructed within the 17th century via clerics at the eu continent: responding to influential reviews of the Irish as ignorant barbarians, they released works demonstrating the worth and antiquity of indigenous tradition and made conventional annalistic claims in regards to the antiquity of Irish and connections among eire and the biblical and classical global greatly recognized.

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75 Poets noted parallels between the Irish and Israelites. Such readings attributed (in part at least) the sufferings of the Irish to their own moral failings and unfaithfulness to God. 76 The pagan Irish worshiped Jupiter, king of heaven and earth, Neptune, Pluto, Vulcan, the smith of the black face, Pan, the herdsman, Juno, Pallas, Venus, and Thetis, and others, including the sun, moon, and stars. Among the classicizing names, the figure of Aoibheall, the ghost/fairy woman of Craglea, Co. Clare, made an appearance.

OUP CORRECTED PROOF – FINAL, 6/2/2017, SPi THE STAGE IS SET  The king was made head of the clergy. Their lands and livelihoods were confiscated together. The Bible was changed from Latin to English; They make an act against the hearing of Mass. 78 A catalogue of legal expressions—Latin, English, and Norman French— “invaded” Ireland, linguistic interlopers, conferring authority on their human counterparts. Is docht na dlithe do rinneadh dár ngéarghoin: Siosóin cúirte is téarmaí daora, wardship livery is Cúirt Exchéquer, cíos coláisde in nomine poenae; greenwax, capias, writ, replévin, bannaí, fíneáil, díotáil, éigcirt, provost, soffré, porter, méara, sirriaim, sionascáil, marascáil chlaona (313–20).

Was to experience the shock, violence, and blasphemy of his predations. 83 In them the “sean-Gaill,” or Anglo-Normans, and the “Gael” were a unit: together they constituted “the nation,” the authentic “seed” entitled to the land. As the eighteenth century got under way, poems such as these, and the ideas they enshrined, provided a context for the study of the classical languages in Ireland. As in other places, of course, Latin and Greek remained standard 83 See also the poem of Éamonn an Dúna.

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